Oxycontin & Opiate Addiction Treatment

Trusted Drug Treatment Program in Seattle, WA

At Schick Shadel, patients in our opiate addiction treatment program get:

  • Effective 10-day inpatient treatment
  • Confidence knowing 65,000+ patients have already been treated
  • A proven medical alternative to 12-step programs
  • Most insurance programs accepted
  • Treatment in a medical hospital from certified and registered professionals
  • On-site medical detox treatment
  • Non-Religious Program
  • Patients Can Have Laptops, Cell Phones & Visitors

Chemical Dependency Treatment for MS Contin, Percocet, Vicodin,
OxyContin, & Others

Schick Shadel Hospital’s prescription opiate treatment program is a counter conditioning-based program for those addicted to smoking, swallowing, and/or inhaling OxyContin and other prescription opioids. The smoking and snorting of powdered (ground-up) prescription opiates is an increasing source of opioid dependency—smoked and snorted OxyContin and prescription opioids produce intense euphoria very rapidly. The nearly immediate delivery of a large dose of an opioid like OxyContin to the brain creates powerful reinforcement for continued use of the drug.

OxyContin and prescription opioid dependency has proven to be highly resistant to treatment through conventional therapies. That is why Schick Shadel is offering our powerful, proven effective treatment program for prescription opiate addictions.

Seattle Opiate Addiction Treatment

Schick Shadel’s program for opiate addiction treatment is based on our treatment of alcohol addiction, which is the most successful rehabilitation program in the nation*. Counter conditioning is an incredibly powerful tool that succeeds where counseling and traditional recovery methods may fail. For particularly addictive drugs like opioids, counter conditioning can produce excellence results.

*#1 success rate for treating alcoholism based on results of a verified survey of former patients (success being measured as total abstinence for one year and assessed by self-evaluation), as against published success rates from verified, comparable studies of other medical institutions.